Lorne L. Dawson, University of Waterloo

Professor Religious Studies Sociology and Legal Studies Waterloo, Ontario ldawson@uwaterloo.ca Office: (519) 888-4567 ext. 35340

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Bio/Research

Dr. Lorne L. Dawson is the Chair of the Department of Sociology and Legal Studies at the University of Waterloo (since 2011). He is a Full Professor in the Department of Sociology and Legal Studies and the Department of Religious Studies, which he chaired as well (2000-2006). Most of his research...

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Bio/Research

Dr. Lorne L. Dawson is the Chair of the Department of Sociology and Legal Studies at the University of Waterloo (since 2011). He is a Full Professor in the Department of Sociology and Legal Studies and the Department of Religious Studies, which he chaired as well (2000-2006). Most of his research is in the sociology of religion, particularly the study of new religious movements, and he is perhaps best known for his book Comprehending Cults: The Sociology of New Religious Movements (2nd ed., Oxford University Press, 2006). He has also published work dealing with theory and methods in religious studies, sociological theory, religion and the Internet, charismatic authority, millennialist movements, and the failure of prophecy. He has written two books, edited three, and published over sixty academic articles and book chapters. His work on why some new religions become violent set the stage for a new and primary research interest in terrorism, particularly the process of radicalization in homegrown terrorist groups. In this capacity he has published “The Study of New Religious Movements and the Process of Radicalization in Home-grown Terrorist Groups,” Terrorism and Political Violence, 22, 2010: 1-21, and is currently co-editing a book on religion, radicalization, and securitization in Canada set to be published by University of Toronto Press. His chapter in this book, “Making Sense of Homegrown Terrorism: The Case of the Toronto 18” is the first publication based on his ongoing study of the Toronto 18 case. He has made numerous invited presentations on terrorist radicalization to academic and government groups in recent years (e.g., Defence Research and Development Canada, CSIS, Public Safety, Homeland Security, Global Futures Forum, Metropolis, Conference Board of Canada, CASIS, RCMP National Security Criminal Investigations Program).



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