Marcus Milwright, University of Victoria

history in art Professor Victoria, British Columbia mmilwrig@uvic.ca Office: (250) 721-6302

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Bio/Research

Marcus Milwright completed his D.Phil at the Oriental Institute of the University of Oxford in 1999. He joined the Department of History in Art in 2002. His research focuses upon the archaeology of the Islamic period, the art and architecture of the Islamic Middle East, cross-cultural interaction...

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Bio/Research

Marcus Milwright completed his D.Phil at the Oriental Institute of the University of Oxford in 1999. He joined the Department of History in Art in 2002. His research focuses upon the archaeology of the Islamic period, the art and architecture of the Islamic Middle East, cross-cultural interaction in the Medieval and early Modern Mediterranean, the history of medicine, craft practices in Late Ottoman Syria, and the architecture and civil engineering of southern Greece during the Ottoman sultanate.

He is the author of two books: An Introduction to Islamic Archaeology, The New Edinburgh Islamic Surveys (Edinburgh University Press, 2010); and The Fortress of the Raven: Karak in the Middle Islamic Period (1100-1600), Islamic History and Civilization, Studies and Texts 72 (Brill, 2008). His articles have appeared in peer-reviewed journals including Muqarnas, Turcica, Journal of the Royal Asiatic Society, Palestine Exploration Quarterly, Levant, Medieval Ceramics, al-Rafidan, and the Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies, and he has contributed chapters to The New Cambridge History of Islam (volumes 1 and 4), the Encyclopaedia of Islam Third Edition, and several other edited volumes. He has curated an exhibition, Steel: A Mirror of Life in Pre-Modern Iran, at the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford (2001). He is currently working on a history of balsam in the Medieval period and a study of portraits of Muslim rulers in European printed books of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.



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