Andrew Johnston, Carleton University

Associate Professor History Ottawa, Ontario andrew_johnston@carleton.ca Office: (613) 520-2600 ext. 4154

Bio/Research

My current research examines the “crisis” of liberalism that afflicted the world's industrial economies at the beginning of the 20th century. The project began as a study of American liberal internationalism before the First World War and has expanded into a more comprehensive international histo...

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Bio/Research

My current research examines the “crisis” of liberalism that afflicted the world's industrial economies at the beginning of the 20th century. The project began as a study of American liberal internationalism before the First World War and has expanded into a more comprehensive international history of the diplomatic, economic, social, intellectual, and transnational filaments that crossed the north Atlantic in the generation before the war. It aims to understand how different nation-states responded to the internal fissures induced by the rise of industrial labour, women's activism, and various faces of colonial/imperial resistance. Their responses pointed, ultimately, toward the catastrophic war of 1914, but also past it, toward a world of liberal-capitalist governance.

In a general sense, I am a historian of modern American foreign relations, although the label itself is limiting. Having studied and written on NATO nuclear strategy in the 1950s, I came to the conclusion that much of what I had been doing as a diplomatic historian was barely scraping the surface. Understanding how states act on behalf of their nominal people involves, at the very least, an understanding of how such peoples are constituted historically as an identity, and how that sense of identity is postulated against a world of other identities. I was impressed by George Herbert Mead's microsociological studies of the self and am thus inclined toward a broadly social understanding of state interaction, which involves trying to look at the evolution of those agents who represent the state and those—capital, religion, culture, ideas—that often transcend it. All of this is to say, that I am deeply interested not only in history, but in international relations theory, as well social and cultural theory, gender, race, imperialism, post-colonialism, the history and practice of Pragmatism, among others. I also teach U.S. cultural and environmental history.



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