Audrey R. Giles, University of Ottawa

Assistant Professor Human Kinetics Ottawa, Ontario audrey.giles@uottawa.ca Office: (613) 562-5800 ext. 2988

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Bio/Research

I am an Associate Professor in the School of Human Kinetics (Leisure Studies). I entered my undergraduate studies at Queen's University with a desire to become a sport psychologist; however, after spending summers working in Nunavut, the Northwest Territories, and Northern Alberta, I became incr...

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Bio/Research

I am an Associate Professor in the School of Human Kinetics (Leisure Studies). I entered my undergraduate studies at Queen's University with a desire to become a sport psychologist; however, after spending summers working in Nunavut, the Northwest Territories, and Northern Alberta, I became increasingly interested in socio-cultural aspects of sport, recreation, physical activity, and community health.

As a result, my SSHRC-funded doctoral research examined Dene women's involvement in Dene games. In particular, my feminist, poststructural, ethnographic research focused on, and continues to focus on, the discursive production of understandings of tradition, health, and gender equity, as well as the roles that power relations, policies, and politics play in the production of these discourses. My current SSHRC-funded program of research focuses on cultural aspects of drowning prevention in the NWT and Nunavut. My highly interdisciplinary research touches on all of the following disciplines in some way: leisure studies, sport, physical activity, health, anthropology, Aboriginal studies, and women's studies.

In general, my research interests include: Aboriginal peoples’ involvement in physical practices, in particular, menstrual traditions associated with Indigenous women’s leisure activities; the Dene Games; the Arctic Winter Games; the NWT Aquatics Program, the notion of gender equity and its impact on sport and recreation policy in Northern communities; contested understandings of ‘tradition’; cross-cultural examinations of understandings of gender, gender equity, and notions of leisure; feminist poststructuralism; community health; qualitative research methods and methodologies.



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