Belinda Dodson, Western University

Associate Professor Geography London, Ontario bdodson@uwo.ca Office: (519) 661-2111 ext. 87319

Bio/Research

As a member of the Southern African Migration Project (SAMP) and Urban Food Security, social geographer, Belinda Dodson is extensively involved in projects on cross-border migration. Her research helps understand the intersections between development, gender, and migration practices, focusing on ...

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Bio/Research

As a member of the Southern African Migration Project (SAMP) and Urban Food Security, social geographer, Belinda Dodson is extensively involved in projects on cross-border migration. Her research helps understand the intersections between development, gender, and migration practices, focusing on xenophobia and food security. These projects cover the countries of Botswana, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, Zambia and Zimbabwe.

Cross-border labour migration is a major source of livelihood in the Southern African region, despite taking place within a highly restrictive policy regime. Also with urbanization drastically transforming this region, examining the topic of food security can have a potential impact on poverty reduction and reducing famine.

In addition to applied research, Dodson is also affiliated with Western's Centre for Migration and Ethnic Relations, which informs public policy and practice that facilitate the well being of immigrants and ethnic minorities in Canada and around the world.

Belinda Dodson grew up in Swaziland, Zambia and South Africa.

I specialize in international development, with a regional focus on Southern Africa. I am also affiliated with Western's Centre for Migration and Ethnic Relations. My current research focuses on three themes: gender dimensions of cross-border migration, xenophobia in South Africa, and urban food security. I am interested in supervising graduate students on topics related to migration, gender, and food security, preferably in Southern Africa or, for migration, in countries of immigrant destination. Examples of my current graduate students' thesis topics are "Gender and remittances to Zimbabwe" and "Gender and food security in Blantyre, Malawi".



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