Camille Hernandez-Ramdwar, Ryerson University

Academic Coordinator, Caribbean Studies, The Chang School for Continuing Studies Associate Professor On sabbatical until June 30, 2018 Toronto, Ontario chernand@ryerson.ca Office: (416) 979-5000 ext. 4193

Bio/Research

Dr. Camille Hernandez-Ramdwar is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at Ryerson University in Toronto, Canada, and the Academic Coordinator for Caribbean Studies at the Chang School for Continuing Education.

Her areas of research include Caribbean cultures and identiti...


Click to Expand >>

Bio/Research

Dr. Camille Hernandez-Ramdwar is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology at Ryerson University in Toronto, Canada, and the Academic Coordinator for Caribbean Studies at the Chang School for Continuing Education.

Her areas of research include Caribbean cultures and identities; African traditional religions in the Caribbean; Caribbean tourism; diasporic, transnational and second generation identities; and racism and Caribbean peoples in Canada.

Her recent work appears in International Encounters: Higher Education and the International Student Experience (2018); Sociology and Criminology Open Access (2014); Caribbean Healing Traditions: Implications for Health and Mental Health (2013), Journal of Heritage Tourism, (2013); Caribbean Journal of Education (2010); Searching for Equality: Inclusion and Equity in the Canadian Academy (2010); Caribbean Journal of Criminology and Public Safety (2009); Caribbean Review of Gender Studies (2008); and TOPIA (2008).

She is the author of Introduction to the Caribbean: Diversity, Challenges, Resiliency (2016).

Dr. Hernandez-Ramdwar has also written short stories, narratives, and poetry dealing with the issues of diasporic, transnational, and multiracial identities, work which has been published in anthologies such as Talking About Identity: Encounters in Race, Ethnicity and Language (2001), Beneath the Cotton Tree Root (2000), and "...but where are you really from?": Stories of Identity and Assimilation in Canada (1997).


Click to Shrink <<

Links