D. R. Fraser Taylor, Carleton University

Profile photo of D. R. Fraser Taylor, expert at Carleton University

Geography and Environmental Studies Geomatics and Cartographic Research Centre Professor Ottawa, Ontario fraser_taylor@carleton.ca Office: (613) 520-2600 ext. 8232

Bio/Research

Professor Taylor's main research interests in cartography lie in the application of geomatics to the understanding of socio-economic issues. He also has a strong interest in the theory of cartography and has introduced and developed the new paradigm of cybercartography. His interests in cartograp...

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Bio/Research

Professor Taylor's main research interests in cartography lie in the application of geomatics to the understanding of socio-economic issues. He also has a strong interest in the theory of cartography and has introduced and developed the new paradigm of cybercartography. His interests in cartography and international development issues are often inter-related. He has extensive field experience in developing nations, especially in Africa, which included a six year period as an education officer in rural Kenya where he completed his Ph.D. thesis on Rural Development in Murang'a District.

His research interests in this area include: development studies with special reference to Africa, China and Latin America; regional and rural development theory and practice sustainable development an indigenous development strategies; technology transfer in the field of geomatics; Canada's international policies in ODA; and technology transfer. Dr. Taylor led a major SSHRC Initiative on the New Economy project entitled “Cybercartography and the New Economy” which included a Cybercartographic Atlas of Antarctica and a cybercartographic product on Canada's Trade with the World. He was also a collaborator in an InterPARES 2 project which deals with the authentication and preservation of dynamic electronic records. Current research includes the use of Cybercartography to create a series of atlases with Inuit and other aboriginal peoples in Canada's north.



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