Dwayne Winseck, Carleton University

Journalism and Communication Professor Ottawa, Ontario dwayne_winseck@carleton.ca Mobile: (613) 231-6793
Office: (613) 520-2600 ext. 7525

Bio/Research

Dwayne Winseck is Professor at the School of Journalism and Communication, with a cross-appointment to the Institute of Political Economy – both at Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada. Dwayne grew up in Windsor, Ontario before heading to the University of Oregon, where he obtained his Ph.D. in 19...

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Bio/Research

Dwayne Winseck is Professor at the School of Journalism and Communication, with a cross-appointment to the Institute of Political Economy – both at Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada. Dwayne grew up in Windsor, Ontario before heading to the University of Oregon, where he obtained his Ph.D. in 1993. Before making Ottawa his home in the frigid winter of 1998, he lived and taught in Britain, the People's Republic of China, the Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus as well as the United States. His research and writing examines the political economies of communication, media history, new media, communication networks and their relationship to markets, the entertainment industries, surveillance and national security, media regulation, as well as theories of democracy and globalization. His latest book (co-authored with Robert M. Pike), Communication and Empire: Media, Markets and Globalization, 1860-1930 (2007, Duke University Press), won the Canadian Communication Association's G.G. Robinson Award for best book of the year in 2008.

Dwayne's work has international influence and is often referred to by sociologists, historians, economists, political scientists and regulatory experts.

I am currently involved in several research projects and initiatives. The most significant of these is the International Media Concentration Research Project. This project brings together roughly 50 scholars from around the world to examine the state of concentration over a span of twenty-five years in nearly every segment of the media and telecoms industries, from the press, television and the film industries, to the Internet and wireless telephony, among many others. Using a standard methodology across such a broad range of media, dozens of countries, and over a long span of time, the project – initiated by the Columbia Institute of Tele-Information at Columbia University, New York – aims to create a rich and authoritative body of evidence and analyses that help to further understanding of the highly contentious and extremely important subject of media concentration.

While not formally a part of this effort, my work on the International Media Concentration Project is directly contributing to two new book initiatives. The first of these is a sole-authored initiative and is tentatively entitled Political Economies of the Media and Cultural Industries. London: Bloomsbury Academic (contracted for publication in late-2010). A second and closely related initiative is a joint effort between Professor Dal Yong Jin (Simon Fraser University). This co-edited volume includes the work of a dozen scholars from North America, Europe, Asia and Latin America and its main thrust is evident in our working title, Political Economies of the Media: Ownership, Markets and Financialization of the Media and Cultural Industries. London: Bloomsbury Academic (contracted for publication in late-2010). Lastly, I continue to be very interested in the study of 'global media history', and to this end I am collaborating with a colleague from Delhi, India, Vibodh Parthasarath, on another co-edited collection tentatively entitled: Global Media Histories: The Flow of Media, Capital, People and Ideas in the Late-19th and Early-20th Centuries. We expect to complete this effort in late 2011 and submit it to the Series Editor at Routledge (London)).



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