Emmanuel Bourbouhakis, Princeton University

Assistant Professor Princeton, New Jersey ebourbou@Princeton.EDU Office: (609) 258-6687

Bio/Research

I joined the Classics Department in 2011 as part of a bid to offer students greater access to the long and varied legacy of Hellenism in late antiquity and the Byzantine middle ages, while also expanding Princeton University's distinguished research profile in Byzantine Studies. I earned my Ph.D ...

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Bio/Research

I joined the Classics Department in 2011 as part of a bid to offer students greater access to the long and varied legacy of Hellenism in late antiquity and the Byzantine middle ages, while also expanding Princeton University's distinguished research profile in Byzantine Studies. I earned my Ph.D in Byzantine Language and Literature at Harvard University's Department of Classics, where I also taught as a lecturer, and I remain committed to the venerable tradition of the study of ancient Greek and Roman literature and history. My interest in the works of Homer, Thucydides, Plato, Virgil, Horace and Tacitus, is abiding and I enjoy initiating students to the inflected genius of Greek (and, occasionally, Latin). Equally enjoyable for me are courses in translation, such as CLA 335, dedicated to understanding the formation and reception of 'Classical' culture down to our own time. In addition, I teach courses aimed at introducing students to late antique and medieval language and literature, such as CLG 240, on the first Christian texts, the Lives of Saints, pagan 'holdouts' like Libanius or Christian 'classicists' like Procopius, and the many types of Byzantine writings largely unfamiliar to most (did you know the Byzantines enjoyed reading romantic novels?!).
Like all the faculty in this department, I am committed to providing graduate students from Classics as well as other departments with the intellectual framework and specialized training necessary to pursue an academic career at the highest levels. I am thus available to anyone who needs (or simply desires) to become well versed in post-classical and Byzantine registers of Greek and its many literary genres. My research interests include the ample field of rhetoric and performance in late antiquity and Byzantium, post-classical and medieval historiography, textual criticism, Byzantine letter-writing, reception of the Classics in the Byzantine Middle Ages, and palaeography. This, of course, is a provisional list to which I am quite happy to add any subject proposed by a curious student.


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