Gordon Francis, University of British Columbia

Profile photo of Gordon Francis, expert at University of British Columbia

Medicine Professor Vancouver, British Columbia gordon.francis@hli.ubc.ca Office: (604) 806-8591
(604) 806-9269

Bio/Research

Gordon Francis is a native of Vancouver and obtained his BSc in Biochemistry from Simon Fraser University in 1979. He obtained his medical degree from McGill University in 1984 and then did a rotating internship and residency in internal medicine at St. Paul’s Hospital and UBC, followed by a fel...

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Bio/Research

Gordon Francis is a native of Vancouver and obtained his BSc in Biochemistry from Simon Fraser University in 1979. He obtained his medical degree from McGill University in 1984 and then did a rotating internship and residency in internal medicine at St. Paul’s Hospital and UBC, followed by a fellowship in endocrinology and metabolism at the University of Alberta. He then spent 4 years at the University of Washington in Seattle as a senior research fellow studying mechanisms of high density lipoprotein (HDL) formation and clinical lipidology. From 1994-2007 he was a member of the CIHR Group in Molecular and Cell Biology of Lipids and from 2000-2007 was Director of the Cardiovascular Risk Reduction Clinic at the University of Alberta in Edmonton. In 2007 he returned to UBC where he is currently Professor of Medicine in the Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Director of the Heart and Stroke Foundation of BC & Yukon Lipid Research Laboratory in the Heart Lung Institute, and Director of the Healthy Heart Program Prevention Clinic, both at St. Paul’s Hospital. He currently holds research grants from CIHR, the Heart and Stroke Foundation and Pfizer Canada. Recent awards have included an Alberta Heritage Foundation for Medical Research Senior Scholar Award, the University of Alberta Department of Medicine Award for Excellence in Academic Mentoring, and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada Gold Medal in Medicine.

Dr. Francis’ research involves understanding the mechanisms of formation of HDL, the “good” cholesterol particles, in order to develop new therapies that increase HDL formation for the treatment and prevention of coronary heart disease and stroke. Current major projects in his lab and clinically include the development of synthetic peptides based on the structure of an oxidized form of HDL that increase HDL formation, understanding the differences in HDL formation by medial and intimal arterial smooth muscle cells, and studying alterations in HDL production in patients with lysosomal cholesterol storage disorders. A position is currently available for a postdoctoral fellow.


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