Helen M. Ostovich, McMaster University

English Professor Hamilton, Ontario ostovich@mcmaster.ca Office: (905) 525-9140 ext. 24496

Bio/Research

Helen Ostovich's expertise centres on Ben Jonson, on his stage practice, and his influence on fellow dramatists. She has published articles on Shakespeare and on Jonson, most recently dealing with issues of gender and Jonson's reputation for misogyny, on Jonson’s interests in the new science, and...

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Bio/Research

Helen Ostovich's expertise centres on Ben Jonson, on his stage practice, and his influence on fellow dramatists. She has published articles on Shakespeare and on Jonson, most recently dealing with issues of gender and Jonson's reputation for misogyny, on Jonson’s interests in the new science, and on his connections with the Cavendish family. She has produced a modern critical edition of his four major comedies called Ben Jonson : Four Comedies (London: Longman, 1997) and an edition of his Every Man Out of His Humour for Revels Plays (Manchester UP, 2001). Her edition of Jonson's The Magnetic Lady for the Cambridge UP's complete works of Jonson, will appear in 2010 as a book and CD ROM. Ostovich has also co-edited with Elizabeth Sauer (Brock University) Reading Early Modern Women published by Routledge in 2004. She is currently editing Shakespeare’s All’s Well that Ends Well with co-editor Karen Bamford (Mount Allison University) and Andrew Griffin (University of California Santa Barbara) for Internet Shakespeare Editions; and Heywood and Brome’s The Late Lancashire Witches and A Jovial Crew for the new Richard Brome Electronic Edition. She was editor of the REED (Records of Early English Drama) Newsletter from 1994-97 and is now the editor of the peer-reviewed journal of theatre history and performance, Early Theatre: A Journal Associated with the Records of Early English Drama. She is one of the General Editors of the Revels Plays (with David Bevington, Alison Findlay, and Richard Dutton), the Series Editor of Studies in Performance and Early Modern Drama for Ashgate Publishing, and with Professor Alexandra Johnston (REED, University of Toronto) is involved in the recovery of performance styles of an early modern acting company as part of a large project called “Shakespeare and the Queen’s Men”, which will involve performances in Toronto and Hamilton, a conference, and publications (electronic and print) of playtexts and essays. The collection of essays, co-edited with Holger Schott Syme and Andrew Griffin, is called Locating the Queen’s Men, 1583-1603: Material Practices and Conditions of Playing (Ashgate, 2009). She has also contributed to the making of the website Performing the Queen’s Men http://tapor.mcmaster.ca/~thequeensmen/.



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