J. Marshall Beier, McMaster University

Associate Professor Political Science Hamilton, Ontario mbeier@mcmaster.ca Office: (905) 525-9140 ext. 23888

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Bio/Research

Marshall Beier received his PhD in Political Science from York University and is a former Associate Director of the York Centre for International and Security Studies. He has been in the Department of Political Science at McMaster University since 2000.

His teaching and research interest...


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Bio/Research

Marshall Beier received his PhD in Political Science from York University and is a former Associate Director of the York Centre for International and Security Studies. He has been in the Department of Political Science at McMaster University since 2000.

His teaching and research interests are rooted in critical approaches to security studies and international relations theory, in particular postcolonialism, poststructuralism, and feminist approaches. Other interests include issues of human security, weapons proliferation, arms control, and disarmament.

In his current research he has been exploring two broad areas of empirical focus through theoretical lenses fashioned by a commitment to the constructedness of social life. The first of these involves intersections between indigeneity and conceptual treatments of security and the realm of the international. This work has been concerned with exploring tensions between Indigenous discourses of global politics and varied attempts by Indigenous people(s) to make their voices heard in the established international system and its attendant institutions.

Drawing on insights from his theoretical work, the balance of his research agenda is marked by an interest in offering new perspectives on contemporary security issues. Projects in this vein have focused variously on ballistic missile defence, the movement to ban antipersonnel landmines, and the 'Revolution in Military Affairs.' For the last several years he has led an integrated research and teaching initiative inquiring into emergent challenges and opportunities for arms control and disarmament. He has recently initiated a new multi-year project on the militarization of childhood, the first product of which is a recently published edited volume on the subject.



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