Jim Miller, University of Saskatchewan

History Professor Saskatoon, Saskatchewan J.R.Miller@usask.ca Office: (306) 966-5806

Bio/Research

Dr. Miller holds a BA (1966), M.A. (1967) and PhD (1972) from the University of Toronto. Professor Miller joined the University of Saskatchewan in 1970.

Dr. Miller is a nationally recognized historian whose scholarly research and publications have contributed to our understanding of crit...


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Bio/Research

Dr. Miller holds a BA (1966), M.A. (1967) and PhD (1972) from the University of Toronto. Professor Miller joined the University of Saskatchewan in 1970.

Dr. Miller is a nationally recognized historian whose scholarly research and publications have contributed to our understanding of critical issues in Canadian history, especially in the area of French/English relations, and aboriginal/white relations.

Dr. Miller is the author or editor of five books and twenty articles in leading academic journals. Professor Miller's monographs and edited collections include Equal Rights (1979) an examination of the impact of the Ontario-based Equal Rights Association of the 1880s on federal politics; Skyscrapers Hide the Heavens (1989) a history of Indian/white relations in Canada which was recognized as the 1993 outstanding North American book on the subject of human rights by the Gustavus Myers Centre for the study of Human Rights; Sweet Promises: A Reader in Indian/White Relations (1991), a volume that complements Skyscrapers Hide the Heavens as a reader for students; Shingwaulk's Vision (1996), the first comprehensive study of the history of native residential schooling in Canada; and Big Bear (Mistahimusqua) (1996), a biography of one of the most famous and revered Plains Cree leaders of the nineteenth century. Shingwauk's Vision, widely regarded as a seminal work on Native residential schools for its comprehensiveness, argument and balance, was named the co-winner of the non-fiction category of the Saskatchewan Book Awards (1996) and winner of the J. W. Dafoe Prize for the book which best contributes to the understanding of Canada or its place in the world (1997).



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