John Smol, Queen’s University

Biology Environmental Studies Professor Kingston, Ontario smolj@queensu.ca Office: (613) 533-6000 ext. 36147

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Bio/Research

The research in my lab focuses on the study of the complex interactions between a lake's biota and the environment. Most of our research uses paleolimnological techniques, which allow us to reconstruct the environmental histories of lakes. Because historical reconstructions are dependent on an un...

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Bio/Research

The research in my lab focuses on the study of the complex interactions between a lake's biota and the environment. Most of our research uses paleolimnological techniques, which allow us to reconstruct the environmental histories of lakes. Because historical reconstructions are dependent on an understanding of living algal and invertebrate communities, a variety of studies dealing with present-day lake systems are also being investigated. A central theme is often the close linkage between aquatic and terrestrial systems. Projects are split between studies dealing with applied aspects of environmental degradation (and recovery), and studies dealing with more theoretical subjects related to long-term successional patterns in lake systems. Ongoing projects include:

Environmental degradation and recovery in lake systems. Paleolimnological approaches are being used increasingly in studying and resolving lake management issues. A large number of studies are now in progress dealing with problems such as lake acidification, eutrophication, taste and odour problems, as well as other issues.

Limnology and environmental change of Arctic lakes. Aquatic research in the Arctic is still exploratory in many respects. Our ongoing research includes the description of the present-day limnological characteristic of these poorly studied ecosystems, to studying the long-term environmental changes in Arctic lakes and ponds using paleolimnological approaches. Two major foci include climatic change and contaminant transport in these sensitive ecosystems.

Other research projects include the study of long-term environmental and climatic change in lakes from different regions, as well as using lake sediments to track past fluctuations in sockeye salmon and aquatic seabird populations. Collaborative work with archeologists allows us to also study the effects of past cultures on aquatic ecosystems.



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