Karin Bauer, McGill University

Languages, Literatures & Cultures Professor Montreal, Quebec karin.bauer@mcgill.ca Office: (514) 398-3647
(514) 398-4400 ext. 094384

Bio/Research

Broadly speaking, Professor Bauer's research is in the areas of intellectual history, cultural theories, the Frankfurt School, gender studies, Nietzsche, and contemporary German thought, literature, and film. Professor Bauer has also undertaken extensive archival research for a study of Nietzsche...

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Bio/Research

Broadly speaking, Professor Bauer's research is in the areas of intellectual history, cultural theories, the Frankfurt School, gender studies, Nietzsche, and contemporary German thought, literature, and film. Professor Bauer has also undertaken extensive archival research for a study of Nietzsche’s sister, Elisabeth Förster-Nietzsche. She discovered an unpublished novella written by Förster-Nietzsche and investigated the strategies of colonial domestication employed by Nietzsche's sister in pursuit of an anti-Semitic colonial project in Paraguay.

Her interests focus on questions of radical aesthetics, narrative strategies of dissent, collective creativity, and the formation of counterpublics. Her recent book on the writings of radical icon Ulrike Meinhof explores the rise of a radical political culture of dissent in the 1960s. Her current SSHRC-funded research project entitled “Shaping Counterpublics: Ulrike Meinhof, konkret, and the Collective Imagination” investigates how alternative public spheres emerge to contest, augment, and subvert dominant ideas and paradigms. It examines the development of the concept of a counterpublic in relation to evolving concepts of publicity and mediality as it links the formation of a counterpublic in postwar Germany to historic processes of democratization and the attempt to move from a culture of consensus to a political culture of dissent. Counterpublics are examined in the context of theories of collectivity and relational aesthetics and as sites of collective creativity. Questions of gender and the participation of women in the counterpublic sphere are also an integral aspect of the study.


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