Kevin Allen, University of British Columbia

Assistant Professor Land and Food Systems Vancouver, British Columbia kevin.allen@ubc.ca Office: (604) 822-4427

Bio/Research

I am interested in studying the fundamental reasons why foodborne pathogens continue to be a significant issue in our food chain. Correspondingly, my research is focused on several divergent areas. First, I am interested in examining how stress response physiology is affected by food chain-releva...

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Bio/Research

I am interested in studying the fundamental reasons why foodborne pathogens continue to be a significant issue in our food chain. Correspondingly, my research is focused on several divergent areas. First, I am interested in examining how stress response physiology is affected by food chain-relevant stress events. Specifically, what are the short- and long-term ramifications on cells subjected to sub-lethal stress events? Also, do these events impact the virulence or pathogenic capacity of the organism? By addressing these questions, we hope to develop/model new intervention strategies based on physiological data.

Also, I am interested in antimicrobial resistance of zoonotic foodborne pathogens. In general, animal production environments and/or practices provide selection pressure for development and subsequent dissemination of resistant phenotypes. I am interested in understanding factors which contribute to this phenomenon. This includes performing antimicrobial surveys, examining transmissibility mechanisms and de novo resistance development, and characterizing novel resistance phenotypes from animal and seafood isolates.

Lastly, I am interested in examining factors which may contribute to pathogen contamination of produce (e.g. Norovirus, E. coli O157:H7 and other STEC, Salmonella, etc.). This involves determining potential sources of pathogen prevalence in the food chain. This information can then be used to understand why/how contaminated produce occurs. Further, I am interested in examining the physiological processes that pathogenic organisms use to survive on and/or in plant tissue.


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