Mark Humphries, Memorial University of Newfoundland

Assistant Professor History St. John's, Newfoundland and Labrador mhumphries@mun.ca Office: (709) 864-6109

Bio/Research

Dr. Humphries� research focuses on the fields of war and health, gender and conflict, and military operations in the First World War era. He believes that military history should be written comparatively within a global or transnational context and that both the battlefield and home fronts should...

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Bio/Research

Dr. Humphries� research focuses on the fields of war and health, gender and conflict, and military operations in the First World War era. He believes that military history should be written comparatively within a global or transnational context and that both the battlefield and home fronts should be approached from a war and society perspective. This means employing the methods and frameworks adopted by social, cultural, and intellectual historians to answer new questions about how conflict shapes and is shaped by society. It also means building bridges to the larger historical community and embracing a variety of perspectives and approaches.

Mark�s current major research interest is the experience of war and how psychological trauma was interpreted by soldiers and military/pension officials and the effect of those experiences on their families up to the 1970s. This project grew out of earlier work on the diagnosis and treatment of shell shocked soldiers during the Great War and a comparative book which he co-authored with Terry Copp on shell shock in Commonwealth forces from the late 19th century to the present. The current project is based in part on a sample of approximately 400 shell shocked soldiers taken from Canadian hospitals in France, Britain, and Canada which will be used to the explore diagnosis, treatment, outcomes, and then long-term effects. This has involved extensive research into newly available files at the Department of Veterans Affairs as well as records that have recently been transferred to Library and Archives Canada. The first article published from this research explored how gender norms and dominant conceptions of masculinity shaped the state�s approach to the shell shock �problem� during and after the war. It was published in the Canadian Historical Review in September 2010 and received the 2010 CHR Prize for the best article published that year in the journal. A book titled War�s Lingering Touch: Shell Shocked Soldiers and their Families will be forthcoming from University of Toronto Press.



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