Michael Orsini, University of Ottawa

Associate Professor Political Studies Ottawa, Ontario morsini@uottawa.ca Office: (613) 562-5800 ext. 2532

Bio/Research

A political scientist and former newspaper reporter, Michael Orsini is Associate Professor in the School of Political Studies at the University. Orsini has been at the University since 2003, having taught previously at Glendon College, the bilingual liberal arts college of York University in Toro...

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Bio/Research

A political scientist and former newspaper reporter, Michael Orsini is Associate Professor in the School of Political Studies at the University. Orsini has been at the University since 2003, having taught previously at Glendon College, the bilingual liberal arts college of York University in Toronto.

His research interests include health policy and politics, and, particularly, the role of civil society actors in health policy processes. His Ph.D. dissertation, “Blood, Blame and Belonging: HIV, Hepatitis C, and the Emergence of Blood Activism in Canada,” examined the mobilization of persons infected with tainted blood in Canada. An article based on this research which was published in the Canadian Journal of Political Science was awarded the John McMenemy Prize for the best article published in the journal in 2002.

Orsini recently completed two research projects one of which was a CIHR-funded study, titled “From Silence to Voice: A Qualitative Glimpse in the Lives of People with Hepatitis C”. The project examined how the “illness narratives” of Hepatitis C patients can better inform policy. The second project, on which he was a co-investigator, examined how Canada’s changing governmental form was shaping the boundaries of citizenship through health and social services at the local level in four Canadian cities. Orsini led the Montreal arm of this CIHR-funded study.

Orsini is currently involved in two new projects. The first, titled “Health Policy from Below: Social Movements and Contested Illness in Canada and the United States,” explores citizen contestation in the health field in Canada and the U.S., using case studies of three illnesses: 1) multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS); 2) asthma; and 3) autism. This project, which recently received SSHRC funding, examines how non-state actors, as members of health social movements, have sought to influence policy and discourse in the health field. Secondly, he is a co-investigator on a project led by Ronald Labonte and Ted Schrecker of the IPH that looks at how globalization processes are affecting the health of marginalized Canadians in three major metropolitan cities.

In addition to teaching courses at the undergraduate and graduate levels in Canadian Politics, Health Policy, and Risk and Public Policy, Professor Orsini coordinates a new undergraduate program in the Social Sciences of Health at the University.



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