Penny Gurstein, University of British Columbia

Community and Regional Planning Professor Vancouver, British Columbia gurstein@interchange.ubc.ca Office: (604) 822-3276
(604) 822-6065

Bio/Research

Dr. Penny Gurstein is Professor and Director of the School of Community and Regional Planning and the Centre for Human Settlements at UBC. She specializes in the socio-cultural aspects of community planning with particular emphasis on those who are the most marginalized in planning processes. Her...

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Bio/Research

Dr. Penny Gurstein is Professor and Director of the School of Community and Regional Planning and the Centre for Human Settlements at UBC. She specializes in the socio-cultural aspects of community planning with particular emphasis on those who are the most marginalized in planning processes. Her research focuses on developing strategies and interventions that encourage diversity, equity and urban sustainability in the planning and design of communities. She is currently the co-Principal Investigator of a major Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada Community-University Research Alliance (SSHRC CURA) project focusing on 'Climate Justice' (the link between climate change and inequality) http://www.policyalternatives.ca/projects/climate-justice-project

In that project she is leading the research stream focusing on building resilient communities. Recent books include: Learning Civil Societies: Shifting Contexts for Democratic Planning and Governance (with L. Angeles, 2007, U. of Toronto Press); and Wired to the World, Chained to the Home: Telework in Daily Life (2001, UBC Press). She has also worked on capacity building projects in developing countries focusing on gender and youth development issues most notably in Brazil and has considerable experience working with community groups in the greater Vancouver region.

Past research projects focused on youth engagement and "the hard to house." Most recent projects include two major studies funded by SSHRC. One, funded by SSHRC INE (Initiative on the New Economy) investigated the impact of e-work on companies and communities, in Canada and internationally (www.chs.ubc.ca/emergence/). The other, funded by SSHRC MCRI (Major Collaborative Research Initiative) looked at the impact of government reduction of social services on single parent families on income assistance (www.earlylearning.ubc.ca/CHILD/research_child_poverty.htm). Her current research is investigating strategies for affordable homeownership and rental housing both internationally and in Canada. She is a member of the Canadian Institute of Planners.


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