Rebecca Rix, Princeton University

Assistant Professor Princeton, New Jersey rrix@princeton.edu Office: (609) 258-5371

Bio/Research

Professor Rix specializes in the history of the United States in the nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. She is interested in the intellectual, cultural, and social production of political thought and the historical interplay of ideas and institutions. She teaches and studies the history of...

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Bio/Research

Professor Rix specializes in the history of the United States in the nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. She is interested in the intellectual, cultural, and social production of political thought and the historical interplay of ideas and institutions. She teaches and studies the history of women and gender, social and political history, and legal history; she is interested in feminism and anti-feminism, social movements, civil society and philanthropy, conservatism, political economy, and state formation.

Rix joined the Princeton History Faculty in 2008, completing her Yale Ph.D. the same year. Prior to that, she received numerous fellowships and awards, including Legal History Fellowships at Yale Law School and New York University Law School. Her current book, The Family and the Franchise: The Modernization of Conservative Thought, 1870-1930 focuses on Boston Brahmins and their attempts to halt woman suffrage and other progressive era reforms. These anti-suffragists insisted that the franchise was based on the male-headed family unit, not the individual human being. Exploring the world view and lives of anti-suffragists, and situating their thought in the wider political, cultural, and constitutional values that shaped them, reveals a gendered common thread among the four constitutional amendments of the 1910s and the changes in legal doctrines and political practices that fundamentally re-constituted the written law and the body politic by the mid-1920s.


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