Scott Mitchell, Carleton University

Assistant Professor Geography and Environmental Studies Ottawa, Ontario scott_mitchell@carleton.ca Office: (613) 520-2600 ext. 2695

Bio/Research

I studied geography and biology at Queen's University at Kingston, and geography and environmental studies at the University of Toronto. Before coming to Carleton, I was a faculty member at the University of Toronto for a year, and worked on several research projects there in addition to my docto...

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Bio/Research

I studied geography and biology at Queen's University at Kingston, and geography and environmental studies at the University of Toronto. Before coming to Carleton, I was a faculty member at the University of Toronto for a year, and worked on several research projects there in addition to my doctoral studies. This included projects examining soil erosion and environmental decision support systems in the Loess Plateau region of China, and evaluation of potential forest nitrogen saturation and lake acidification in the Adirondack region of New York State.

Here at Carleton, I have joined the Geomatics and Landscape Ecology Laboratory. I am continuing a long term study to evaluate and improve techniques to predict and measure productivity patterns in natural grasslands, under both “known” conditions and climate change scenarios. Another project is developing methods to measure and classify Canada's forest inventory. I am currently investigating new research opportunities in Eastern Ontario and Western Québec, under the general theme of how the integration of new sources of data and understanding can alter our ability to monitor and predict ecosystem behaviour.

I joined GLEL in 2005, and am now a co-director, with most of my graduate students working in the facility. My research interests include a variety of spatial analysis techniques to assist with environmental decision making. More specifically, I have been working on uncertainty in land cover classification, measurement and modelling of primary productivity, and characterization of landscape pattern.



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