Sébastien Grammond, University of Ottawa

Associate Professor Law Ottawa, Ontario sebastien.grammond@uottawa.ca Mobile: (613) 808-3620
Office: (613) 562-5902

Bio/Research

Sébastien Grammond is Dean of Civil Law at the University of Ottawa. Since he joined the faculty in 2004, he has taught Obligations (contract law), Aboriginal Peoples and the Law, Civil Procedure and Business Organizations. He became full professor in 2011. He was Vice-Dean, Research from 2005...

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Bio/Research

Sébastien Grammond is Dean of Civil Law at the University of Ottawa. Since he joined the faculty in 2004, he has taught Obligations (contract law), Aboriginal Peoples and the Law, Civil Procedure and Business Organizations. He became full professor in 2011. He was Vice-Dean, Research from 2005 to 2008, Acting Dean from 2008 to 2009 and he has been Dean since 2009. In the course of these administrative duties, he participated in the implementation of the minor in law and the programme de droit canadien, and he contributed to the development of a research culture at the Civil Law Section. He also participated in the creation of a summer course on indigenous legal traditions taught in certain Cree communities of northern Quebec.

Sébastien Grammond’s main research interests pertain to indigenous peoples and the law and, more generally, to the legal treatment of minority issues. He authored three books and several published papers on those subjects. Aménager la coexistence : les peuples autochtones et le droit canadien, published in 2003, is a comprehensive textbook on indigenous peoples and the law in Canada and received the Quebec Bar Foundation prize. Identity Captured by Law: Membership in Canada’s Indigenous Peoples and Linguistic Minorities (2009) provides an in-depth analysis of how legal definitions of membership in indigenous communities and linguistic groups may be compatible with human rights and the autonomy of the groups concerned. Sébastien Grammond’s current research projects focus on the recognition of indigenous groups and benefit from funding granted by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council of Canada. His other publications in this field deal with issues such as the adaptation of human rights to cultural difference or the reception of indigenous legal systems in Canadian law.

On the private law side, Sébastien Grammond also conducts research on themes related to contractual justice and the determination of the contents of contracts. He is the author of several articles on contractual interpretation, abusive clauses and implied obligations. He recently published, in collaboration with two colleagues of the Civil Law Section, Quebec Contract Law, a textbook that provides a synthesis of the law of contractual obligations in Quebec for an English-speaking audience.

After studies in engineering, Sébastien Grammond obtained a bachelor of law (1992) and a masters of law (1994) from the Université de Montréal. He began his carreer as a law clerk to Chief Justice Antonio Lamer of the Supreme Court of Canada. He practised law for several years at the firm Fraser Milner Casgrain in Montreal, in particular in the fields of native law, constitutional and administrative law, business law and construction law. Leaving full-time practice aside in 2001, he obtained a Masters in Legal Research (2002) and a Doctorate in Law (2004) from the University of Oxford. As a member of the Quebec (1994) and Ontario (2007) bars, he has frequently argued cases before the Quebec Court of Appeal and the Supreme Court of Canada, especially in Desputeaux v. Éditions Chouette, de Montigny v. Brossard, Christensen v. Roman Catholic Archbishop of Québec and the Securities Reference, as well as before commercial arbitration panels hearing complex cases.

Sébastien Grammond’s achievements have been recognized by several prizes and distinctions. He presented the results of his research not only before Canadian audiences, but also in France, Belgium, Spain and Chile. He also offered training to judges and public service lawyers. He frequently appears in the media, commenting upon subjects with a legal dimension. In 2012, he received the "avocat émérite" (Ad.E.) distinction awarded by the Quebec Bar.


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