Shannon Bredin, University of British Columbia

Assistant Professor Kinesiology Vancouver, British Columbia shannon.bredin@ubc.ca Office: (604) 822-8257

Bio/Research

The overall theme of my research program is to examine the transition from inexperienced to skilled states of motor behaviour and the subsequent changes that emerge as a result of such a transition. From a theoretical perspective, the objective is to investigate the processes and mechanisms that ...

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Bio/Research

The overall theme of my research program is to examine the transition from inexperienced to skilled states of motor behaviour and the subsequent changes that emerge as a result of such a transition. From a theoretical perspective, the objective is to investigate the processes and mechanisms that underlie the learning of complex motor tasks, with a specific interest on the effects of practice on the relationship between perception and action. From a practical orientation, my research focuses on examining the variables that impinge on the practice session, with an explicit interest in identifying those factors that enhance skill acquisition, and conversely, those factors that are detrimental to the long-term retention and transfer of motor tasks. These issues are examined from both the perspective of the learner, as well as from the perspective of the teacher/instructor/coach. The ultimate humanistic goal of this research is to develop instructional strategies and pedagogical paradigms for the enhancement of skill acquisition in a wide range of movement settings. In addition, this research focuses on designing training environments, which promote self-directed learning and life-long physical activity behaviour. Therefore, the aforementioned issues are investigated from a lifespan perspective, which includes such populations as infants and children, aging individuals, and persons with a chronic disease. This research has important application for school-based programs, recreation programs, clinical settings, as well as home-based environments.



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