Yvan Lamonde, McGill University

French Language and Literature Professor Emeritus Montreal, Quebec yvan.lamonde@mcgill.ca Mobile: (514) 486-0705
Office: (514) 398-6887

Bio/Research

The main result of our project was the production of six volumes on the History of the Book in Canada: three volumes in English and three in French, written by 175 authors. From a research point of view, there were other important aspects as well: we managed to complete the project in five years,...

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Bio/Research

The main result of our project was the production of six volumes on the History of the Book in Canada: three volumes in English and three in French, written by 175 authors. From a research point of view, there were other important aspects as well: we managed to complete the project in five years, rather than the six expected (2000– 2005); we made it a collaborative project with men and women, French and English, from all regions of Canada and generations; and we involved six research sites: Dalhousie, Université de Sherbrooke, l’Assemblée nationale in Québec, McGill, University of Toronto and Simon Fraser. Because everyone in our field was somehow implicated, it wasn’t easy for SSHRC (Social Science and Humanities Research Council) to find an external evaluator for the project!

Our goal, besides the production of these books, was to establish the discipline of Book History in Canada, which we did. When we started, there were people all over the place researching the Book in Canada, mostly within the Bibliographical Society of Canada. But there wasn’t an umbrella. Our project gave them an umbrella. Now, for instance, there is the Book History Group as well as Le groupe de recherche sur l’édition littéraire.

Our project fleshed out the intellectual and cultural history of Canada, helping to map the development of ideas and debates. The research, for example, was able to establish that the decade of the 1880s was crucial in the takeoff of a commercialized culture in Canada and it deepened our understanding of the relationships of the First Nations peoples to print culture during the period from pre New France on.


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